published on October 25, 2018 - 4:35 PM
Written by Donald A. Promnitz
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The latest and greatest in office technology was on full display for the Central Valley business community with the Office Technology Expo Show 2018.

American Business Machines held the three-day even from Tuesday to Thursday at the Doubletree by Hilton in downtown Fresno. According to Michael Alfheim, North District manager for American Business Machines, this is their debut expo after opening an office in Fresno.

“This show is really our first big stake in the ground in this community to let them know who we are,” Alfheim said. “Ryan [Jones] hired me five years ago, after he moved into this area with no business, whatsoever. And over the past five years, we have grown exponentially.”

Based in Bakersfield, American Business Machines is a three-generation, family-owned business headed by Ryan Jones. The company offers solutions and equipment for such office tasks as printing, copying and sign making, and offering such brands as Canon and Duplo.

Among the new equipment showcased at the event was the Colorado 1640 from Océ. Specializing in signage, this printer uses UV gel as opposed to the standard eco solvent or latex, providing a higher quality image with increased durability.

American Business Machines also showed off the new VarioPrint by Canon, which contains a lifespan of 1 billion copies.

“We’re having a real good look… Canon’s doing a really good job, so I can definitely see it lasting five years, easy,” said Art Borges of Central Unified School District, who was one of the people attending Thursday. “So yeah, that is a good consideration. Of course, because we don’t always want service coming in.”

Borges and his colleague, Deanna Sherrell, said they were looking to buy a color copier. They also plan to return next year.

Over the course of the event, American Business Machines further reached out to the Fresno community through the Poverello House and Catholic Charities, providing a meal to a needy family with each person to RSVP. According to Tim Kent, strategic account manager, this resulted in 147 meals.

“Now, it was also based on community outreach,” Kent said. “So as a local, family-owned business, reaching the community is important, because we can give back to the community, no matter where we are.”


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