whiskey and cards

Image via Diego Molina on unsplash.com

published on September 12, 2022 - 2:30 PM
Written by Ben Hensley

Table Mountain Casino may soon be permitted to sell alcohol — a development hotly anticipated since the July unveiling of a new, 110,000 square-foot gaming facility north of Fresno.

The process to transfer an existing alcohol license from Yoshino Investment Corp. to Table Mountain began July 22, confirmed the Fresno office of the state Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC).

Yoshino Japanese Restaurant closed its River Park location in June 2020, with only its 6226 N Blackstone Ave. location still operating. The transfer is for the River Park location license. It was sold for $30,000. That’s the amount filed with the Fresno County Recorder’s office, according to Jason Montgomery, Fresno’s supervising agent with ABC.

Montgomery was unsure of the exact date the pending transfer would be complete.

“Each license is different,” he said. “Usually it takes a couple months for the license to issue. But this one might be a little more complex.”

A request for comment from Table Mountain was not fulfilled Monday afternoon.

All licenses must be processed through ABC, with signage posted notifying patrons of the change. Residents within 500 feet of the premises must also be notified of the license, as well as residents living within 100 feet being consulted and ensured they will not be disturbed.

Local law enforcement is also involved in the process to see if there is any oppositions to the license or details the department should be made aware of.

Montgomery noted the department is currently not aware of specifics regarding where in the casino alcohol could be sold.

Since reopening, Table Mountain Casino now has four restaurants, in addition to a food court, which is home to additional, faster service food options.

Among the new high-end options is Sukai Teppanyaki Grill, a 12-floor Japanese restaurant with views of the foothills and the Valley below. 

With roots as a bingo hall in 1987, Table Mountain stands out as one of a few tribal casinos in the region that doesn’t serve alcohol.


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